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My Blog

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Halloween 2014

Posted on November 3, 2014 at 3:08 PM Comments comments (85)
Happy Halloween!

Whiskers and Tails had a great Halloween.  I received this great picture from one of my clients of their dog "Arya".  It doesn't look like she is enjoying very much. Lol.

Be safe this holiday season.  Check out my blog about "Holiday Safety Tips".

Chows

Posted on July 28, 2014 at 8:01 PM Comments comments (56)


















Leo is a brand new Whiskers and Tails Client.  He is 14 years old and is a Chow mixed breed.  

Most commonly kept as pets, Chow Chows tend to display discernment of strangers and can become fiercely protective of their owners and property. I know Leo likes me, however, when I come to his house to walk him, he still barks at me, still unsure of me. Leo's owner and I have been spending time together with Leo, so that he can get more familiar with me and feel safe.

Chow Chow's living in an apartment will need daily exercise to prevent restlessness and boredom. Upon realizing that exercise is a daily occurrence, Chow Chow will tend to be more assertive with owners in anticipation of such activities.

This breed of dog has many strong loyal bonds with friends and family, however the Chow Chow dog is usually overly protective of one or two main family member(s).

Chow Chows become very stubborn and attach to certain individuals, as they age. This is why training them when they are puppies is so crucial because they gain respect for those who care for them.

Hopefully, Leo will respect me after some persistence and patience on my part.

He is a sweetheart and deserves all  the love in the world.


New Client

Posted on July 18, 2014 at 11:28 AM Comments comments (59)
Whiskers and Tails is so fortunate to be able to take care of this gentle giant.  His name is Dexter.  Greyhound breed.  He used to race and now is retired.






























Puppies

Posted on July 8, 2014 at 7:50 PM Comments comments (73)
Today I paid my first visit to my new client, "Arya".  She is the cutest French Bull Dog I have ever seen.

On my morning visit, I got to her house to find her behind her baby gate in the kitchen.

On my afternoon visit, I opened the front door to find her standing there greeting me with her sweet little doggie smile.  She had somehow, knocked the baby gate out far enough to escape the kitchen.

I texted her owner's right away and they will take care of tightening the bolt on the gate.

You never know what to expect on your doggie visits.  It is always a surprise.





Labrador Puppies

Posted on May 26, 2014 at 8:09 PM Comments comments (248)



This is little Payton. Two month old Chocolate Labrador Puppy.  He is names after the great Walter Payton of the Chicago Bears.









Ten Tips for Bringing a New Kitten Home

Posted on May 23, 2014 at 3:45 PM Comments comments (47)
1: Banish the Single-Kitten Blues
When you first bring your kitten home, he may miss his siblings and mother. He'll meow in confusion or wake up during the night. Ease his stress by picking him up, stroking him while speaking in a soothing tone. Wrapping a ticking clock in a towel and placing it near his bed to remind him of his mother's heartbeat.

Kittens have so much energy, they need to stay active to be happy. If you bring home two kittens together rather than one, they'll focus their play-fighting, scratching and wrestling on each other, and are less likely to feel lonely. They are also a lot more fun to watch.

2: Make Home Alone Time Fun
A kitten left home alone should be secured in one room with his bed, litter box, scratching post, food and water. If you'll be gone until evening, add a nightlight. Give him enough safe toys to keep him busy, such as a trackball toy. Place a radio just outside his door, turned to a classical music or country western station. Many pet sitters have found cats seem to prefer these two genres. Other cats like listening to talk shows, perhaps soothed by the human voice. If your kitten will always be alone during the day, spend extra time petting and playing with him when you return.

3: Have a Vet Check Him Out
Your vet should see your kitten within a day or two of his arrival. She'll check for ear mites and fleas, and examine a fecal sample, because most kittens have some form of worms. Many vets routinely deworm all kittens with an oral medication. At six to seven weeks, your kitten should receive a "three-way" vaccine that protects against the respiratory diseases FVR (feline viral rhinotracheitis) and FCV (feline calicivirus), as well as distemper (feline panleukopenia), with a booster shot given 12 to 14 weeks later. If your kitten is at least nine to 10 weeks old, he'll be tested for FeLV (feline leukemia) and FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus). He can get a rabies shot, usually required by law, at 12 weeks of age.

Kittens can be spayed or neutered as early as eight weeks of age, but your vet can determine the best time for this surgery. Spaying protects your female kitten from the risk of mammary, uterine and ovarian cancers, and spares her the stresses of pregnancy. Neutering a male reduces his risk of prostate cancer, and he won't "spray" to mark his territory. Because the urine of intact males literally stinks, neutering your kitten will make the litter box cleanup less of a chore. Spaying or neutering also helps reduce the problem of cat overpopulation.

4: Keep Her Playtime Safe
A kitten's high energy level makes her eager to play at any time. To keep her safe, choose toys carefully, just as you would for a child. Avoid those with buttons, bells or other small parts that can come off and be swallowed. Watch for sharp edges, and beware of string, yarn or ribbon, as these are dangerous if ingested.

If a toy has any of these, always supervise the kitten when she plays with it. Small stuffed animals to attack and a ball too large to fit into her mouth will provide hours of kitten fun. You can hold a plastic fishing pole, anchored by a secure line to a fuzzy mouse or other small toy, in front of the kitten who will delight in chasing this prey.

5: Help Him Adapt to Other Pets (and Vice Versa)
Before bringing in a new kitten, be sure your resident pets have recently been checked by your vet, and are disease-free. When the kitten is in his or her secured room, your other cat will sniff around the doorway. Give your resident cat extra attention to ease his or her anxiety. Once the kitten feels comfortable, allow the two to meet briefly. Stay in the room while they sniff and explore each other. There may be some hissing and growling. If one cat shows real hostility, separate them and try again a few days later.
Never leave a dog alone with a new kitten. Dogs can become aggressive, or a kitten may claw at a dog's face. Make sure your dog is properly leashed as you introduce him or her to your kitten following the same procedure you would to introduce a cat to your kitten. This lets the animals learn each other's scent. The kitten should not be allowed to run away because the dog may think chasing it is a game. Reward both pets for calm behavior. Always supervise their interactions until the kitten is fully grown.

6: Make a Room-by-Room Introduction
After you've kitten-proofed, introduce your kitten to your home one room at a time. Place his open carrier in whichever room you are introducing him to so he has a retreat if he wants it, and let him walk around while you sit quietly. Talk to him softly as he explores. He may hide under a bed or scoot behind a refrigerator, so you need to be vigilant. If you don't want him in the habit of climbing on your bed, gently remove him and place him on the floor. Bring him back to his own space, and repeat this introduction process in each room of your home until he has explored everyplace.

7: Kitten-proof Your Home
Kittens can get tangled or choked by anything swinging or hanging. Therefore, keep your new pet safe by securely anchoring drape or blind cords out of reach.
To prevent chewing on electric and phone cords, bundle them with a cord manager and fasten away from kittens' reach.

Rubber bands, jewelry, Christmas decorations, balloons and other small items are dangerous to kittens that may swallow them. Remove poisonous plants, and roach or ant traps and make sure the toilet lid is down. Keep kitchen and bathroom cabinets closed so your kitten doesn't encounter bleach, detergent, dental floss and other household items when exploring.

In the laundry area, keep washer and dryer doors closed: A kitten may climb into a warm dryer for a nap. Remember, if something would be harmful for a toddler, it's the same for your kitten.

8: Help Him Meet the Family
Although everyone will want to hold the kitten, limit handling for the first few days while your new pet adjusts. Set up his bed, litter box and food in a quiet room where he can be secured until he gets to know his new home. Introduce one family member at a time, allowing the kitten to come to you and learn your touch.

Children under five should not interact with kittens; many shelters and rescue groups will not allow families with very young children to adopt kittens because children can be rough, sometimes tragically, with kittens. Older children can be shown how to hold a cat -- with one hand just behind the front legs, the other supporting his hindquarters. They should be taught never to grab a kitten's tail or ears, or pick it up by its scruff. Show children how to gently pet a cat's head and back. Remind them to always wash their hands after being around kitty. Always supervise children's interaction with kittens, especially if they have friends visiting.

9: Provide All the Comforts
Kittens are growth machines for their first year and need different nutrition than adult cats. Extra protein for muscle and tissue development, fat for fatty acids and plenty of calories are key to kittens' health. Specially formulated kitten foods fitting their nutritional requirements should be given until the kitten is a year old.

Away from his littermates or mother, the kitten needs to feel secure as well as warm. Whether you provide a cardboard box lined with a blanket or a fancier bed from a pet supply store, keep your kitten's bed in a quiet place, away from household traffic.
Litter training is easy -- cats instinctively bury their waste -- but takes patience. Put the litter box in a corner or other secluded spot. After your kitten has awakened from a nap, or shortly after she's finished eating, place her in the box. If she doesn't dig or scratch, gently take one of her front paws and simulate digging with it. Praise her if she uses the box, but never punish her if he doesn't. Just place her in it at hourly intervals until she gets the idea.

To discourage clawing furniture, provide a carpet-covered scratching post or Petco sells a spray that discourages the kitten from scratching by giving off an odor they do not like, but the owner cannot smell.

10: Give It Time
Kittens are sometimes adopted at six weeks of age, but 10 to 12 weeks is better. Those extra weeks spent with his mother and siblings help a kitten learn acceptable behavior, from getting along with siblings to getting used to human contact. A six- or seven-week-old kitten may be stressed and confused at being separated from his or her family too soon; your kitten may be fearful of people, and could try to hide or run away from interaction. If a kitten has been gently handled and has gotten used to humans, he will be friendlier and better adjusted. In choosing a kitten, look for one that is inquisitive, doesn't shy away from your touch, and is ready to play.









San Diego Human Society Newsletter

Posted on May 6, 2014 at 10:42 AM Comments comments (75)
San Diego Humane Society Newsletter



In the May 2014 Edition:
News: Events:
Support the Humane Society:
 
News:
Mouse and Wifi Update

After being packed away in a Cox Communications box and being shipped from Hollywood to San Diego, Mouse and Wifi have been receiving around the clock care in the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA Kitten Nursery. 

However, this week we need your loving thoughts since they are struggling in their third week of life. They've been having tummy troubles and aren't gaining weight to our satisfaction. Neonate kittens are especially fragile and these types of health issues can be common, especially after such a stressful beginning to life. We are optimistic that they'll pull through because we're giving them all the love and care we can administer. Thank you for your compassionate thoughts we will keep you updated on their progress!


 
Events:
Support the Animals through giveBIG San Diego.

On Tuesday, May 6th, the San Diego Humane Society is participating in a city wide 24 hour online philanthropic day of giving called giveBIG San Diego.
You can support the animals at the San Diego Humane Society by visiting our giveBIG web page anytime on Tuesday, May 6th to make a donation: 

The San Diego Foundation has offered an incentive pool of $200,000. The more donations we recieve the bigger piece of the incentive pool we receive! 

2014 Walk for Animals

Join us as we celebrate our four-legged Superheroes on Saturday, May 10, 2014 at NTC Park at Liberty Station in Point Loma. This beautiful location boasts ample parking, a 2 mile walk route with an optional 1/2 mile shorter route, and tons of space for dog activities!

The upcoming walk promises to be bigger and better than ever before...we can't wait to see you there!




In the May 2014 Edition:
News: Events:
Support the Humane Society:
 
News:
Mouse and Wifi Update

After being packed away in a Cox Communications box and being shipped from Hollywood to San Diego, Mouse and Wifi have been receiving around the clock care in the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA Kitten Nursery. 
However, this week we need your loving thoughts since they are struggling in their third week of life. They've been having tummy troubles and aren't gaining weight to our satisfaction. Neonate kittens are especially fragile and these types of health issues can be common, especially after such a stressful beginning to life. We are optimistic that they'll pull through because we're giving them all the love and care we can administer. Thank you for your compassionate thoughts we will keep you updated on their progress!
Events:
Support the Animals through giveBIG San Diego
On Tuesday, May 6th, the San Diego Humane Society is participating in a city wide 24 hour online philanthropic day of giving called giveBIG San Diego.
You can support the animals at the San Diego Humane Society by visiting our giveBIG web page anytime on Tuesday, May 6th to make a donation: 
The San Diego Foundation has offered an incentive pool of $200,000. The more donations we recieve the bigger piece of the incentive pool we receive! 
 
2014 Walk for Animals
Join us as we celebrate our four-legged Superheroes on Saturday, May 10, 2014 at NTC Park at Liberty Station in Point Loma. This beautiful location boasts ample parking, a 2 mile walk route with an optional 1/2 mile shorter route, and tons of space for dog activities!
The upcoming walk promises to be bigger and better than ever before...we can't wait to see you there!
 
Animal Adventure Camp
Children can spend a week during summer break learning about and interacting with our adoptable animals at our Animal Adventure Camp! Games, crafts and hands-on animal activities all help children develop respect and a positive attitude toward all living beings Register online today!
 
Happy Hour Pet Lecture  
Did you know that your pet’s dental condition can affect his/her overall health?  
Come to our Happy Hour Lecture at our San Diego Campus on May 15th to learn about all forms of oral disease, including caries (cavities), endodontic (root canal) disease, cancer, orthodontics, trauma, and the local and systemic effects of periodontal disease, from Dr. Brook Niemiec, DVM. Professional and home maintenance of good oral health will also be covered. Register online today!
 

On Saturday, May 17th at the CA Center for the Arts in Escondido, you can dance the night away under the trees and stars to the awesome sounds of blues, or sit back with your glass of wine or beer and enjoy fabulous entertainers while raising money for charity!
To learn more visit: http://www.bonsallrotary.com
Your ticket purchase, when purchased via the link below, benefits the Escondido Humane Society.
 
Support the humane Society:
2015 Photo Fundraiser
It's here! We are now accepting pet photo submissions for the 2015 "Make your Pet a Pin-Up" Photo Fundraiser!
Does your picture-perfect pet like to ham it up for the camera? If so, now is your chance to get them in the running to be a model-of-the-month in our 2015 wall calendar, along with your chance to win a variety of fun prizes.
Pictured here: "Chip" - one of the online entrants!
The last day to make your pet a star is August 31, 2014.
Details on how to enter here»
  a, only available until the end of the month! Specials end on May 31st     Upcoming Events   Events happening
at our adoption centers! Tots & Tales
Tuesday, May 13
10:30am - 11:00am
San Diego Campus
read more»Pet Loss Support Group
Thursday, May 29
6:30pm 
Oceanside Campus
reserve your space»

For more events:

Canine Cocktails
Hotel Indigo

509 9th Ave, San Diego
Thursday, May 8
5:30pm-9:00pm

Wag & Walk
Otay Valley
Sunday, May 11
9:00am-12:00pm

Wag & Walk
Lake Hodges
Saturday, May 17
9:00am-12:00pm

Bull's Smokin' BBQ
Adoption Event
Wednesday, May 21
5pm-7pm
San Diego, CA
read more»     




























Walk for Animals-San Diego Humane Society

Posted on May 6, 2014 at 10:12 AM Comments comments (45)
Saturday, May 10


The 20th Annual Walk for Animals is just one week away, and we need your help to reach our $600,000 fundraising goal.

With the finish line fast approaching, we still need to raise nearly $280,000.
Thousands of homeless and neglected pets throughout the county depend on the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA.

Last year alone, we cared for nearly 10,000 animals. But we can’t do this important work without your help.

The donations you collect through the Walk for Animals help us provide food, shelter, medical care, and a second chance to the homeless animals that come through our doors. Your support means we can fight animal cruelty and rescue animals from neglect and abuse.

Please join the Walk for Animals on Saturday, May 10 and start raising pledges today. Use discount code "HERO" for $5 off registration.

If you cannot participate, please make a donation to help us reach our goal.
Together, we can make a short walk go miles for animals.







Spring Break with Spirit

Posted on April 18, 2014 at 11:53 AM Comments comments (45)


This is my latest and sweetest client. His name is Spirit and is 3 years old.

Spirit is a Staffordfordshire Bull Terrier otherwise known as a ,"Pit Bull". 

A Pit bull's genetic make up was developed so it would be a good fighting dog. However, this genetic disposition does not mean that all Pit bulls are aggressive or that they are prone to attacking other animals. Pit bulls require the same amount of socialization training as other dogs during puppy-hood, possibly more. Like any dog, a Pit bull that is well socialized is less likely to attack when it feels threatened. The Pit bull breed is known to be more “rough and tumble” during play time, but frequent socialization with other dogs can mean that a Pit bull pet goes into adulthood with a positive feeling towards other dogs. 























SD Human Socity Spay& Neuter Services

Posted on April 6, 2014 at 10:57 PM Comments comments (74)
Spay and Neuter Services

The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA has accessible spay and neuter programs for the San Diego community. These resources provide affordable spay/neuter surgeries to individuals who meet the eligibility requirements based on income.  The program also aims to target specific animal populations that are at the highest risk for overpopulation, like pit bulls and feral cats.

For eligibility, and for additional info about our spay and neuter services, please call the San Diego Humane Society at (619) 299-7012 extension 2334 or 2335.
The San Diego Humane Society currently offers the following spay/neuter resources: 

Spay/Neuter Clinic
Designed to provide affordable and accessible spay/neuter opportunities five days a week based on financial need. 
The fees for spay/neuter are:
  • $30 for male cats
  • $50 for female cats
  • $50 for male dogs
  • $75 for female dogs

No additional fees for pregnant, in-heat, or cryptorchid; pain medication is also included.
Rabies vaccine is required for all dogs (available for $6.00 if animal is not current). Other vaccines and microchips are also available, call for types and prices.
Litter Abatement Program (LAP)
Free public spay/neuter service for those who:
  • Are relinquishing a litter of puppies or kittens (from their pet)
  • Have found a stray litter of kittens and are able to capture the stray parent animal(s) (in the cities of Oceanside and Vista)

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